Locomotives

Catalog of all in-stock N scale locomotives

ALC-42
ALC-42

ALC-42 N scale

EMD E5 & Silver Streak Zephyr
EMD E5 & Silver Streak Zephyr

The EMD E5 was built as a 2000 horsepower (despite the “E” in the name of the locomotive series originally referring to an “Eighteen hundred” horsepower engine specification) locomotive for passenger service specifically for the Chicago Burlington & Quincy. The major difference between the E5 and its other early E-unit brothers was its stainless steel finish and distinctive fluting, specifically chosen to match the CB&Q’s corrugated passenger trains such as the California Zephyr, Nebraska Zephyr, and Silver Streak Zephyr

EMD E8/9A and E8/9B
EMD E8/9A and E8/9B

The E8/9 diesel locomotive shared the similar "bulldog nose" carbody style as the shorter, more popular F7 and was powered by two separate 12-cylinder prime movers (i.e., diesel engines) capable of producing 2250/2400 hp. The E8/9 also rode on A-1-A trucks (powered axle-idler axle-powered axle), resulting in an exceptionally smooth ride favored by crews. The E8/9 was produced in both A-units and cabless B-units. The A-units were usually built to railroad specification of either single or dual headlight and freight or passenger pilot. Like the F3 and F7 of the same time period, the E8/9 was utilized in both passenger and freight service.

EMD F40PH
EMD F40PH

The EMD F40PH is synonymous with the Amtrak era of American passenger trains. Although it has been retired from Amtrak service, it operated for over 20 years. It continues to be the motive power for commuter railroads all over the United States. Over 400 F40PH locomotives have been manufactured by EMD in various configurations.

EMD F7A/B
EMD F7A/B

The F-Unit is probably the most recognized diesel locomotive in North American history. It was found on railroads from East to West and North to South. Similar in appearance to its predecessor, the EMD F3, the EMD F7 was a 1500 hp multi-purpose locomotive. Although originally promoted as a freight-hauling unit by EMD, the F7 was also used in passenger service hauling such trains such as the Santa Fe Super Chief and the Great Northern Empire Builder. The F7 was the fourth model in GM-EMD's highly successful F-unit series, and was for a long time (until the introduction of the EMD SD40-2 freight unit) was the best selling Diesel-electric locomotive ever made.

EMD SD40-2 Early & Mid
EMD SD40-2 Early & Mid

As a prototype, the SD40-2 was the most popular second-generation diesel with sales of over 3000 in the U.S. and more than 700 in Canada. There were many variations of this popular diesel because of the long production run, with Early units representing a pre-1990 appearance and Mid Production units depicting later runs of locomotives with deck mounted ditch lights so the modeler can use them with their modern freight rolling stock and in combination with other modern locos.

EMD SD70ACe
EMD SD70ACe

The SD70ACe is the latest in the line of EMD's "70" locomotives, an evolution of the SD70MAC, although its radiator design harkens more to that of the SD80/90 body. The SD70ACe has been designed to fit the latest EPA standards and regulations, and sports 4300 horsepower.

EMD SD70M
EMD SD70M

Introduced in 1992, EMD's SD70M was a 4000 horsepower locomotive that ran on EMD's new steerable truck design, known as the HTCR-II radial truck. This new truck allowed the locomotive to transfer its power to the rails more efficiently, which in turn enabled two SD70M locomotives to pull a train that would have taken three SD40-2s to pull. The early version of this locomotive had a flat radiator rather than the more effective flared radiators of later versions.

EMD SDP40F
EMD SDP40F

The EMD SDP40F was Amtrak's first, official, built to order locomotive (previously they had operated using second hand equipment, such as E8's, F7's and even GG1's). A need for new and more reliable equipment spurred the development of the SDP40F. Based on the framework of the SD40-2, the SDP40F was geared for speed, with a top operational velocity of 100 mph and a pair of steam generators to supply heat and hot water for the passenger trains it would pull, such as the ex-Santa Fe "El Capitan" and "Super chief" (renamed the "Southwest Chief" in its combined state).

GE ES44AC/DC
GE ES44AC/DC

The ES (Evolution Series) of locomotives are built by GE Transportation Systems and designed to meet the U.S. EPA's Tier 2 locomotive emissions standards that took effect in 2005. These Evolution Series locomotives are equipped with AC traction motors and are powered by a newly designed "GEVO-12" 12 cylinder engine that produces the same power as the 16 cylinder AC4400CW, but with fewer emissions and greater fuel economy. It also carries a redesigned air-to-air dual-fan heat exchanger, which gives it its distinct "oversized" radiator; a common spotting feature for these new locomotives.

GE P42 "Genesis"
GE P42 "Genesis"

The General Electic P42 locomotive is also known as the "Genesis" locomotive. The P42 is a modern 4200 horsepower passenger locomotive used across the United States and Canada. Amtrak's P42 has replaced the EMD F40PH in revenue service and today they are used throughout the United States and often operated in a mixed consist of Phase IV and Phase V schemes.

GG1
GG1

The GG1, one of the PRR's most famous and recognizable locomotives, is also one of the most curiously designed. Technically two locomotives under one shell (a "G" class locomotive is a 4-6-0 by PRR specification, therefore the GG1 was two "G" locomotives in a 4-6-0:0-6-4 arrangement). This added up to a 4.6k horsepower locomotive that was staggeringly powerful, even by today's standards. Designed in the 20's, built in 30's, and not retired until the 80's, the GG1 had an incredible lifespan and survives today as a testament to its time in both its unique Loewy-design and overwhelming performance.

MPI MP36PH
MPI MP36PH

The Motive Power International MP36PH is used by a number of cities across the country for commuter service, their often distinctive and colorful paint schemes serving to make these locomotives the “figureheads” for local commuter service.

Siemens ACS-64
Siemens ACS-64

The ACS-64, also known as the "Amtrak Cities Sprinter", is Amtrak's replacement of the aging AEM-7 and HHP-8 electric locomotives for operation in the Northeast and Keystone Corridors. Built by Siemens and based on the EuroSprinter European electric locomotive design, the Cities Sprinter is nonetheless a unique model to North America and is built entirely in the United States. The Prototype, which entered service in February 2014, can pull as many as 18 Amfleet cars at speeds of up to 125 miles per hour!

Steam Locomotives
Steam Locomotives

Big steam in a small scale! Kato USA makes several variations of the 4-8-4 Steam Locomotive, including the Southern Pacific "Daylight" GS-4 and the Union Pacific FEF-3. These models feature excellent pulling power and smooth drive mechanisms that make them some of the best operating steam locomotives in N scale!